Skip to content

White House could be compromised over alleged scandal: Jesse Watters

Fox News personality Jesse Watters discussed a possible Secret Service scandal that could compromise the White House and cause the public to lose trust in the Joe Biden administration in general.

A Secret Service member was also involved in a situation that was reported a few days ago on CNBC. That report said the following:

“One of two men criminally charged with impersonating Department of Homeland Security law enforcement agents in Washington, D.C., offered to give an assault rifle worth $2,000 to a U.S. Secret Service agent who was assigned to the protective detail of first lady Jill Biden, a court filing says.

That filing also says that one of the defendants, Arian Taherzadeh, lent what was purported to be a “government vehicle” to the wife of that Secret Service agent, who was not identified by name, and that Taherzadeh “also provided her with a generator.”

The Secret Service agent lived in a Washington apartment building on the floor below Taherzadeh’s apartment, according to the filing, which was written by an FBI agent in support of the criminal complaint against Taherzadeh, 40, and his 35-year-old co-defendant, Haider Ali.

"*" indicates required fields

Should Joe Biden resign?*
This poll gives you free access to our premium politics newsletter. Unsubscribe at any time.
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Ali allegedly told witnesses in the case that he had connections to ISI, the Pakistani intelligence agency, a prosecutor said during a court hearing Thursday.

Taherzadeh also allegedly gave members of the Secret Service and an employee of the Department of Homeland Security “rent-free apartments (with a total yearly rent of over $40,000 per apartment), iPhones, surveillance systems, a drone, a flat-screen television, a case for storing an assault rifle, a generator and law enforcement paraphernalia,” the filing says.

One of those agents was assigned to protect the White House as part of the Secret Service’s uniformed division, the filing said.

That agent lived rent-free in a three-bedroom apartment provided by Taherzadeh at the same complex, according to the filing, which said the residence normally would rent for more than $48,000 annually.”