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Yikes: Biden’s EV Push Hits Another Major Problem

Team Brandon is intent on getting more and more Americans to buy electric vehicles. Whether it’s Transportation Secretary “Mayor Pete” Buttigieg licking his chops at the idea that higher gasoline prices are causing more Americans to look at expensive EVs they might not have otherwise considered or some other administration apparatchik demanding we move away from gas-powered cars and toward the supposedly “green” EVs, electric vehicles have become a priority for this administration.

The big problem is that people have good reasons for not wanting them. While the idea of an emissions-free vehicle is appealing, the limited range of those vehicles, their inability to tow heavy loads that combustion-powered trucks easily can, their unsuitability for road trips, and safety concerns with the charging stations are all real concerns. And that’s before considering how useless they’d be during a hurricane or other disaster that requires fleeing with extra fuel.

But those aren’t the only problems with the electric vehicles the left wants us to buy, and there might be a bigger problem with the whole agenda: the electric charging stations that people rely upon to use the cars and that the EV pushers claim make them usable for a road trip just don’t work.

That, at least, is what a recent J.D. Power survey regarding electric vehicles found, as Bloomberg noted, reporting:

Many US public charging stations fail to work when electric-vehicle drivers need them, according to a new J.D. Power report that underscores the Biden administration’s challenge in building out a network of stations nationwide.

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In a survey of more than 11,550 drivers, the firm found that one in five didn’t manage to charge their vehicle during a visit to a station. Of those that didn’t get their vehicles charged, 72% blamed faulty equipment.

If you have one of these cars and want to go farther than to work and back (with that commute presumably being within the electric car’s limited range), that’s a major problem.

You can’t just pour a jerry can of gas into an EV like you can with a normal car, you need to plug it in at some charging station and fill it up. If the charger doesn’t work and you’re about out of battery, that’s a huge problem.

And according to the survey, it’s not just a theoretical one: faulty equipment was a major problem for those 20 percent of consumers that weren’t able to charge up their EV during a station visit.

That’s a big problem because it means that Brandon can’t just throw money at the problem and have more charging stations built: the chargers need to work reliably, and right now they apparently don’t, something that’s a big problem for EV owners and might be stopping many people from buying them, as Bloomberg also noted, saying:

The infrastructure law that Biden signed last year devotes $5 billion to building a nationwide network of EV charging ports along major travel corridors, with stations spaced no more than 50 miles apart. But the J.D. Power survey, conducted with EV data firm PlugShare, suggests that merely deploying those chargers won’t be enough to convince skeptical car buyers to try an EV.

Maybe all these problems will be straightened out someday. But, for now, if reliability is what you’re looking for, then a combustion-powered vehicle that can fill up at any of the many pumps around the nation, almost all of which work quite well and are, in any case, available at a much larger scale than EV chargers, is what you’re looking for.

So, try as Team Brandon might to push us toward EVs, combustion cars still reign supreme for many Americans.

By: Gen Z Conservative, editor of GenZConservative.com. Follow me on Facebook and Subscribe to My Email List